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Treating for mite with FGMO fogging

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TFF Admin

Is anyone using this method of treating for varroa mites? I just administered the firest treatment yesterday and will be observing the results. The research I have read about this seems promising and a local state bee inspector is also using this method for the first time with me and we are sharing notes on the results.

If anyone is interested in using FGMO fogging and I can go into more detail. This is not a new method and has been around since the early 70's. I am not sure why it fell out of favor but am willing to give it try as if it DOES work to any degree, it is a fantastic method to keep your bees treated year round and on a much more frequent basis without risk of adulterating your honey or as much harm or upset to the bees.

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TFF Admin

Just a follow up on this type of mite treatment. I have been using the FGMO fogging treatment since I posted this thread. What can say from my observations (mind you this is NOT a scientific, peer reviewed research study) is that IT WORKS......VERY WELL. I had a number of hives that were weak and struggling. I noticed a substantial improvement in the number of bees, activity, and foraging of each hive. I fog my bees once a week and now have 16 very strong and LARGE hives.

I use the unlimited brood box method (3 brood boxes stacked in the hive for the bees and then I stack the medium honey supers on top) this allows the queen pretty much unlimited mobility to lay brood and manager her hive. It leaves about 180 lbs. of honey in the hive for the bees to over Winter with. I have found that his allows for a very large forager population to bring back nectar and produce honey.

The bees as you might suspect DO NOT like being fogged but seem to quickly fan away the fog and recover.

So far, we have harvested honey from 9 hives and extracted about 53 gallons of honey. We still have 6 more hives to harvest but had to lay off because we ran out of honey storage capacity and it is has been raining several days in a row.

What really surprised me was that the bees are STILL bringing in large amounts of nectar. Normally this time of year, there is NO nectar left at all and I am feeding them sugar syrup but with so much rain, there has been a steady nectar flow since Spring.

I think I may have harvested too early under the circumstances and may wait a few more weeks to harvest the remaining 6 hives. It appears that we may have a very good chance at a big golden rod nectar flow and possibly a late season second harvest.

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TFF Admin

This is an old thread but I felt a need to come back to it and update so that other beekeepers DO NOT DO THIS.  EVER!  Fogging with FGMO just does NOT work.  I paid a LOT of tuition at the University of Hard Knocks learning this and after huge hive losses over the Winter have since moved on to other EFFECTIVE methods of treating for varroa mites like Apivar, OAV, Might Mite Killer thermal treatment, and MAQS.  

What can I say other than live and learn.  I have found that beekeeping is a never ending and continuous process of learning.  That's a good thing.  :happy34:

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